Yeast Bank

1-100%
1-100°F (-17-38°C)
Ale Styles

Blonde Ale (Ale)


Well-balanced, easy drinking style that is known for accessibility and quaffability. Little malt or hop complexity and generally uses all domestic ingredients.

ABV: 3.5-6% IBU: 15-30 SRM: 2-8

Cream Ale (Ale)


A light color and body pre-prohibition style beer which was produced in response to lagers popularity. Cereal malt flavors which come from the traditional use of American ingredients including a percentage of wheat in the grist.

ABV: 4.5-6% IBU: 15-20 SRM: 2-6

Wheat Ale (Ale)


A broad style that can range from malty to hoppy. Either example should use a clean domestic yeast strain which produces a mild fruit and a crisp wheat profile and accentuates any hops.

ABV: 4-6% IBU: 15-30 SRM: 2-8

Kolsch (Ale)


A crisp blond beer that blurs the lines between ale and lager. This pale German Ale undergoes a traditional lagering resulting in clean quaffable beer with slight fruity qualities.

ABV: 4.5-5.5% IBU: 15-30 SRM: 4-8

Ordinary Bitter (Ale)


Low gravity English Pale Ale known for medium fruity esters and balance leading towards the bitterness.

ABV: 3-4% IBU: 22-35 SRM: 5-10

Extra Special Bitter (Ale)


The ESB style is not as common as it’s lower gravity relatives. Use of ingredients is similar to the Ordinary Bitter style except proportionally higher gravity and bitterness.

ABV: 4-5.5% IBU: 30-50 SRM: 8-14

English Pale Ale (Ale)


The term English Pale Ale is used loosely for packaged versions of the Bitter style. Exported versions tend to be slightly higher gravity than the homeland versions to help extend the shelf life.

ABV: 4-6% IBU: 30-50 SRM: 8-14

English India Pale Ale (Ale)


Heavily hopped pale ale which showcases orange-citrus, wood, earthy hop aroma and flavor with fruity yeast esters. *Bitterness and gravity are lower than American IPA’s

ABV: 5-7% IBU: 40-60 SRM: 8-14

American Pale Ale (Ale)


The style which is credited for starting the craft movement, tasty malt backbone that allows the pine and citrus of American hop varieties such as; Centennial, Cascade, Chinook to be the showcase.

ABV: 5-6% IBU: 30-50 SRM: 5-14

American India Pale Ale (Ale)


Assertive new-world hop bitterness, flavor and aroma with little malt presence. Alcohol is med-high.

ABV: 6-7.5% IBU: 45-75 SRM: 5-10

Imperial India Pale Ale (Ale)


The line between the American Barleywine and Imperial/Double IPA is fairly blurred. Imperial IPA differentiates itself with little malt character and influence, low residual sweetness, and by pushing the limits on how much hop flavor, aroma and bitterness and be packed into a single beer.

ABV: 7-10% IBU: 50-90 SRM: 5-14

Irish Red Ale (Ale)


Grainy caramel/toffee notes dominate this low hopped easy drinking modern Irish style.

ABV: 4-5.5% IBU: 12-25 SRM: 7-15

American Amber (Ale)


Also known as a Red Ale, this style is known to be hop forward with slight toasty/caramel malt backbone.

ABV: 5-6% IBU: 20-45 SRM: 10-19

English Brown Ale (Ale)


Mild toasty and caramel forward beer with medium fruity yeast esters along with little hop character and low bitterness.

ABV: 3.8-5.5% IBU: 15-22 SRM: 20-35

American Brown Ale (Ale)


A malty but hoppy beer with chocolate and caramel malt flavors. Generally higher ABV than its English counterpart.

ABV: 5-6.3% IBU: 20-45 SRM: 20-40

Dusseldorf Altbier (Ale)


“Alt” refers to the “old” style of brewing with top fermenting yeast. This amber/brown beer undergoes a lagering phase which produces a clean flavor that allows hop bitterness and malt to be accentuated.  

ABV: 4.8-6% IBU: 20-35 SRM: 12-20

American Porter (Ale)


Ruby to black in color with prominent roasted coffee, chocolate, slight caramel. Bitterness can be fairly agressive compared to English Porter and ABV is less than Stout.

ABV: 5-6.5% IBU: 30-50 SRM: 20-30

American Stout (Ale)


Strong, robust, roasty beer with firm bitterness from one/both hops and roasted malt. Notes of coffee, dark chocolate and molasses can be common malt derived flavors along with a hop sourced pine/resin palate and aroma.

ABV: 5.5-7.5% IBU: 30-70 SRM: 25-50

Imperial Stout (Ale)


A very strong dark, roasty, and bitter beer. American examples can showcase hop qualities to a more extreme than the English versions. Notes of espresso, bitter dark chocolate, soy sauce, with thick viscosity is to be expected. Medium esters can be commonly found in both versions.

ABV: 8-13% IBU: 70-120 SRM: 44+

Irish Dry Stout (Ale)


A regionally diverse style that uses either roasted barley or chocolate and other dark specialty malts. Traditionally 4%-4.5% ABV with lower bitterness.

ABV: 4-5.2% IBU: 12-22 SRM: 25-40

Foreign Export Stout (Ale)


Essentially a higher alcohol version of an Irish Dry Stout which had higher and abv and bitterness to allow an increased shelf life for export. Roast is the prominent malt character with notes of dark fruit and caramel balacned by medium assertive bitterness.

ABV: 5.5-7.5% IBU: 18-35 SRM: 30-50

Sweet Stout (Ale)


Also known as a milk stout, this style of stout uses lactose which adds unfermentable sugars resulting in residual sugars and a sweet finished beer.

ABV: 4-5.2% IBU: 12-22 SRM: 25-40

Oatmeal Stout (Ale)


Usually an English base stout with oatmeal as a percentage of the grist. American ingredients can be used, but usually with more aggressive hopping.

ABV: 4.8-6% IBU: 15-30 SRM: 22-35

Scotch Ale (Wee Heavy) (Ale)


Malt dominating style with toffee and some dark fruits, low bitterness and hop characteristic and smoke is inappropriate for the style.

ABV: 7-9.5% IBU: 25-45 SRM: 22-35

English Old Ale (Ale)


Traditionally a stock ale which was aged 6+ months and used to blend with fresh mild ales. Modern examples tend to have balanced bitterness to increase aging potential while still retaining complex English malt character.

ABV: 7.2-9.5% IBU: 30-50 SRM: 13-25

Barleywine Ale (Ale)


Caramel, toffee, dark fruit malt derived flavors with med esters. American versions of the style tend to have higher alcohol and hop flavor and aroma.

ABV: 8-12.5% IBU: 60-120 SRM: 18-30